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approachingsignificance:

currentsinbiology:

Stalked protozoan attached to a filamentous green algae with bacteria on its surface (160x)
Paul W. Johnson
University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA
Technique: Nomarski Differential Interference Contrast

You’re a stalked protozoan attached to a filamentous green algae with bacteria on its surface

approachingsignificance:

currentsinbiology:

Stalked protozoan attached to a filamentous green algae with bacteria on its surface (160x)

Paul W. Johnson

University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA

Technique: Nomarski Differential Interference Contrast

You’re a stalked protozoan attached to a filamentous green algae with bacteria on its surface

Photo
pearl-nautilus:

Blue Button “Jellyfish”-SquaredBlue Buttons are not true jellyfish, but are Chondrophores. These are actually colonies of polyps. In other words, they are like a tiny colony of animals. Each animal contributes something different to the colony. Some form the central disk, while others form the tentacles. Blue buttons exist in colonies, and mass beachings frequently occur since they are at the mercy of the wind and water currents. Blue buttons generally measure 1.5 inches across or less, and are generally dark blue or turquoise in color, although a lemon-yellow color variant sometimes occurs.Blue buttons, like the Portuguese Man of War, and the By-the-wind-sailor (velella velella), are not true jellyfish, although they are closely related. They are all in the same phylum (cnidaria).What distinguishes them from true jellyfish is the fact that they are, as mentioned above, made up of small colonies of cooperative polyps, rather than being a single animal.
source:

pearl-nautilus:

Blue Button “Jellyfish”-Squared

Blue Buttons are not true jellyfish, but are Chondrophores. These are actually colonies of polyps. In other words, they are like a tiny colony of animals. Each animal contributes something different to the colony. Some form the central disk, while others form the tentacles. Blue buttons exist in colonies, and mass beachings frequently occur since they are at the mercy of the wind and water currents. Blue buttons generally measure 1.5 inches across or less, and are generally dark blue or turquoise in color, although a lemon-yellow color variant sometimes occurs.

Blue buttons, like the Portuguese Man of War, and the By-the-wind-sailor (velella velella), are not true jellyfish, although they are closely related. They are all in the same phylum (cnidaria).

What distinguishes them from true jellyfish is the fact that they are, as mentioned above, made up of small colonies of cooperative polyps, rather than being a single animal.

source:

(via oceansblue)

Photoset

comfortspringstation:

Kitten rejected by mother and raised by golden retriever

(via thefrogman)

Photoset

theladyintweed:

Chateau for sale in France

Built circa 1860 after the original castle burnt down

  • 30 bedrooms
  • Stables
  • Tennis courts

Sotheby’s Realty

(via pricklylegs)

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benigoat:

North America superimposed on Jupiter

Jupiter is the king of the solar system, it has more mass than all the other planets and moons put together, and spans a whopping 88,846 miles (142,984 km) at the equator. It is over 11 times the diameter of our planet, with lightening bolts up to 1,000 times more powerful than Earth’s, and wind speeds in the upper atmosphere that can reach 100 miles per second. This planet races around in just 10 hours compared to Earth’s 24, making it the fastest rotating planet in the solar system. The image above shows the gas giant with how North America and Canada would appear to the same scale, it is completely dwarfed by Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, a storm that has been raging since possibly the year 1665.

benigoat:

North America superimposed on Jupiter

Jupiter is the king of the solar system, it has more mass than all the other planets and moons put together, and spans a whopping 88,846 miles (142,984 km) at the equator. It is over 11 times the diameter of our planet, with lightening bolts up to 1,000 times more powerful than Earth’s, and wind speeds in the upper atmosphere that can reach 100 miles per second. This planet races around in just 10 hours compared to Earth’s 24, making it the fastest rotating planet in the solar system. The image above shows the gas giant with how North America and Canada would appear to the same scale, it is completely dwarfed by Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, a storm that has been raging since possibly the year 1665.

(via pricklylegs)

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levantineviper-archive:

The Lagoon Nebula in the constellation Sagittarius 
Image credit: NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope

levantineviper-archive:

The Lagoon Nebula in the constellation Sagittarius 

Image credit: NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope

(via invaderxan)

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mind blown

mind blown

(via pricklylegs)

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dailyotter:

Oh Hello. Yes, Everything’s Fine Over Here!
Via Beginners Blog Otter
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mindfuckmath:

The Natural Numbers 0-10

(via invaderxan)

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allcreatures:


A spotted seal pup suns itself along Nome Harbor in Nome, Alaska. Nome residents report seeing more seal pups on shore this year with an early disappearance of sea ice. Sunning themselves help pups shed lanugo, the white, wooly coat theyíre born with, and grow new fur.

Picture: Gay Sheffield/AP (via Animal photos of the week - Telegraph)

allcreatures:

A spotted seal pup suns itself along Nome Harbor in Nome, Alaska. Nome residents report seeing more seal pups on shore this year with an early disappearance of sea ice. Sunning themselves help pups shed lanugo, the white, wooly coat theyíre born with, and grow new fur.

Picture: Gay Sheffield/AP (via Animal photos of the week - Telegraph)

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llbwwb:

Graceful Gerenuk (by San Diego Zoo Global)

llbwwb:

Graceful Gerenuk (by San Diego Zoo Global)

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llbwwb:

(via 500px / Malabar Giant Squirrel by Kartik Bhat)
Photoset

reminds me of Simon when he was a kitten

(Source: kittiezandtittiez, via togifs)

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crisbrolo:

“Every star may be a sun to someone.”                                            ― Carl Sagan, Cosmos

crisbrolo:

“Every star may be a sun to someone.” 
                                           ― Carl SaganCosmos

(via invaderxan)